At the end of the Global Health Policy Forum, the question always remains: Where do we go from here? After a full day of intense conversations, moderators Mark Chataway, Jeff Sturchio, and Jane Nelson gathered to discuss top lessons learned and how we might best capture and capitalize on the progressive discussions started at the Forum.

Leading into the session, each challenge panel and plenary moderator was asked to share their key takeaways from their respective session. Lessons learned and shared include:

Erica Tavares – DISASTER RESPONSE VS. RESILIENCE: MIND THE GAP

  1. Stop thinking of disasters as separate from building strong health systems/resiliency – it should be a continuum
  2. Responses need to be locally driven

Kim Keller – IT’S A LONG WAY FROM HOME: REFUGEES AND THE DISPLACED

  1. Advocacy & attention and avoiding donor fatigue
  2. New models for financing to allow for broader opportunities

Veronica Arroyave – HEALTH SYSTEM STRENGTHENING: IT’S A JOURNEY, NOT JUST A DESTINATION

  1. WHO 2008 HSS framework – is it still relevant? Good guide & place to start the conversation
  2. System thinking

Juliemarie Vander Burg – COLLECTIVE IMPACT 2030: A STRATEGIC LINE OF SIGHT ON METRICS

  1. Classic metrics are no longer useful – need more multi-dimensional options
  2. Seek to build capacity
  3. Develop common frameworks
  4. Use shared language
  5. Keep indicators few
  6. Contribute to transparency in spirit of growth

Julie Varughese – MICROBIAL THREATS 101: WHAT’S MINE IS YOURS

  1. Infections disease outbreaks aren’t singular events
  2. Thinking in advance/preparedness
  3. Critical need for a platform for improved collaboration & coordination

Jodi Allison – SUPPLY CHAIN REALITIES: TACKLING THE MISSING LINK

  1. Supply chain & logistics should always be happening up front – don’t leave them out of the conversation
  2. Think of “the last mile” first and not last
  3. Serialization – industry is working to increase quality & trust – comes at high cost – complicated and will take time but will be worth the work

Jane Nelson – PHILANTHROPY: BEYOND CASH/SOLVING THE PROBLEM

  1. New norms, new actors, new actions
  2. Shift from “do no harm” to “be more effective”
  3. Technology being harnessed
  4. “Donor driven” to “community led”
  5. Ongoing tension and link between acute disaster response & long-term HSS and preparedness

Following, the moderators took the opportunity to synthesize both information downloaded by moderators as well as their own key takeaways from a day of observing and participating in the panels.

Jane Nelson:

  • What can non-traditional company/actors do? Local businesses and entrepreneurs?
  • Opportunity to collaborate more on accountability and metrics and evaluation
  • PQMD has done such a tremendous job on Guidelines – what can be done and replicated in terms of evaluation?
  • However difficult advocacy is, there is an incredible network of voices and what could that advocacy agenda look like?

Jeff Sturchio:

  • Threads – importance of linking work of PQMD members to the lives of those in the community of those we respond to
  • “What business are you in? What does PQMD exist to do that no one can do as well?”
  • What is your ambition to change the world given the resources you have?
  • Connecting the dots – applies broadly – what about collaborating on things your org lacks the capacity for
  • It needs to be multisectoral and a coalition – draw on all of the resources and capabilities in a given area – only way we’ll be able to bring together the level of response required to solve the “wicked problems” we are all dealing with
  • How will we know if we’ve accomplished anything? Focus on metrics is important and worthwhile

Mark Chataway:

  • More cynical about the ability to bring about big picture change
  • How can pqmd focus on what is actually achievable?
  • Each linkage requires enormous effort
  • Advocacy, trust (or lack thereof)
  • M&E – PQMD can help others use available intellectual property
  • Offline discussions as valuable as online ones
    • Mistake we must be careful of – often create perverse incentives for govts to “do less” assuming our orgs will step in
    • Ability of PQMD to do with those who are IN power, vs. working with those who we “wish” was in power

PQMD looks forward to continuing the dialogue both in upcoming and future meetings, and we encourage you to join us on the PQMD Community of Practice.

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